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Black and Hispanic Americans remain far more cautious in their approach to the COVID-19 pandemic than white Americans. That's according to recent polls that reflect diverging preferences on how to deal with the pandemic as federal, state and local restrictions decline. Sixty-three percent of Black Americans and 68% of Hispanic Americans say they are at least somewhat worried about themselves or a family member being infected with the virus compared with 45% of white Americans, according to an April poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Experts say divided opinions among racial groups reflect not only the unequal impact of the pandemic on people of color but also apathy among some white Americans.

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FILE - People wait in line for a COVID-19 test in Los Angeles, Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2022. Sixty-three percent of Black Americans and 68% of Hispanic Americans say they are at least somewhat worried about themselves or a family member being infected with COVID-19, compared to 45% of white Americans, according to an April poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

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A new AP-NORC poll shows majorities of Black and Hispanic Americans are at least somewhat worried about themselves or family being infected with COVID-19, compared with fewer than half of white Americans.

AP
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Moderna is asking U.S. regulators to open its COVID-19 vaccine to the nation's youngest children. Kids under 5 are the only group in the U.S. not yet eligible for vaccination. Frustrated parents are waiting impatiently for a chance to protect them. Moderna submitted data to the Food and Drug Administration Thursday. The company hopes the FDA will rule in time for tots to start getting vaccinated by summer. It's a complex decision partly because while other countries give Moderna shots to older children, the U.S. so far has restricted them to adults. Rival Pfizer also is studying its vaccine in the littlest kids.

AP
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FILE - Ilana Diener holds her son, Hudson, 3, during an appointment for a Moderna COVID-19 vaccine trial in Commack, N.Y. on Nov. 30, 2021. On Thursday, April 28, 2022, Moderna asked U.S. regulators to authorize low doses of its COVID-19 vaccine for children younger than 6, a long-awaited move toward potentially opening shots for millions of tots by summer. (AP Photo/Emma H. Tobin, File)

AP
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FILE - A health worker administers a dose of a Moderna COVID-19 vaccine during a vaccination clinic in Norristown, Pa., Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2021. Moderna on Thursday, April 28, 2022, asked U.S. regulators to authorize low doses of its COVID-19 vaccine for children younger than 6, a long-awaited move toward potentially opening shots for millions of tots by summer.(AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

AP
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Dr. Anthony Fauci says the coronavirus is under better control in the United States, but the pandemic isn't over. The nation's top infectious disease expert told The Associated Press that the country is “in a different moment” of the pandemic. After what he calls a phase where COVID-19 cases were explosive, the U.S. is transitioning to better control. Cases are at a lower point than they've been in months but contagious variants are still spreading. Fauci says more work must be done. His comments came a day after he told the PBS “NewsHour” that the U.S. was “out of the pandemic phase.” They reflect how health officials are wrestling with keeping cases and hospitalizations manageable amid an unpredictable virus.

AP
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FILE - Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and chief medical adviser to the president, speaks during a Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee hearing Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington. Speaking Tuesday night, April 26, 2022, on PBS’ “NewsHour,” Fauci said the global pandemic isn’t over but the U.S. currently is “out of the pandemic phase.” But it doesn’t mean the coronavirus threat to Americans has ended. (Greg Nash/Pool via AP)

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Travelers roll their luggage at a baggage claim area at Los Angeles International Airport Monday, April 25, 2022, in Los Angeles. A week earlier, a federal judge in Florida struck down the requirement to wear a mask in airports and during flights. That rule, designed to limit the spread of COVID-19, was due to expire anyway on May 3. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)