As the former editor of The Almanac newspaper and the editor of this magazine for the past several years, I’ve always struggled with where to draw the line when it comes to the boundaries of the South Hills. Sure, our distribution has to have limits – but do our stories? I thought it would be fun to kick the question to some of our neighbors, friends and leaders. The answers vary, but one thing is for sure: it’s a great place to be and there is no shortage of great stories!

“A region is based on partnerships and shared characteristics as well as geography. South Fayette Township shares many community relationships, citizen issues and joint efforts with neighbors who may identify as being in the South Hills or the West Hills. South Fayette is fortunate to be the keystone of the South Hills and West Hills, and we happily consider ourselves part of both regions.”– Andrea Iglar, director of communications and community development, South Fayette Township

“Being a transplant to the area from the north side of Pittsburgh, I consider the South Hills to be anywhere east of the tunnels and anywhere south of 376 until you reach the Washington area. I don’t think there is as much of defined regional boundaries to the South Hills as their is a communal mindset that makes up the region. I think no matter where in the South Hills you are located, such as Mt. Lebanon, Upper St. Clair, South Fayette, Carnegie, Southpointe or one of the other surrounding towns, we all work, live and play in each others’ back yards –making us all connected.” – Mandi Pryor, executive director, South West Communities Chamber of Commerce

“I consider the South Hills from Peters Township to Brentwood and everything in between. I’d almost need to draw a circle on a map to illustrate my particular definition. As far as why, it’s somewhat simple: if you look at the city of Pittsburgh being the middle ground, the west is towards the airport, the east is towards Monroeville, north is McNight Road area and beyond, south is as I’ve explained.” – Judge Ron Arnoni

“Growing up in Baldwin, I felt that was part of the South Hills. I consider the areas south of the Pittsburgh city limits and Allegheny County the South Hills. This would include Dormont, Mt Lebanon, Upper St. Clair, Baldwin, Whitehall, Castle Shannon, South Park and Bethel Park.” – Bethel Park Mayor Jack Allen

“I’m from the South Hills, my husband, the North Hills – many travels through the Fort Pitt Tunnels over the years of dating. My father felt we got married to save on tires! In my mind, any area south of the tunnels means you have arrived in the South Hills!” – Gerda Moul, via Facebook

“I think the South Hills encompasses any area south of Pittsburgh within a one hour drive. I think the boundary would stretch as far to the west as Robinson Township, as far south as Washington, and past Baldwin to the east. As a resident of the South Hills, that geographic area is where I spend most of my time.” – Jena Oberg, artistic director, Little Lake Theater

“Growing up in Peters Township, I always figured we were part of the South Hills because way back when South Hills Village was built it was our go-to place to shop. Since it was so easy to get to I just assumed I lived in the South Hills too!” – Myra Oleynik, library director, Peters Township Public Library

“Generally speaking, when I think of the South Hills, I include those suburban communities extending south of the city surrounding the Route 50, 51 and 19 corridors. I agree with what Wikipedia includes: ‘The South Hills is the southern suburbs of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and the neighborhoods in the City of Pittsburgh south of the South Side Slopes. The Pittsburgh neighborhoods include Knoxville, Mt. Oliver, Mt. Washington, Beltzhoover, Allentown, Banksville, Beechview, Brookline, Carrick and Overbrook. Two suburban municipalities that are included in the South Hills outside of Pittsburgh are Bethel Park and Mt. Lebanon, as well as the boroughs of Castle Shannon, Dormont and Green Tree. The South Hills also includes the townships of Baldwin, Collier, Peters, Scott, South Park and Upper St. Clair, plus the boroughs of Baldwin (not to be confused with the previously mentioned township of Baldwin), Brentwood, Bridgeville, Mt. Oliver (not to be confused with the previously mentioned neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Mt. Oliver), Heidelberg, Whitehall, Pleasant Hills, Jefferson Hills and West Mifflin. All of these places are located within Allegheny County, with the exception of Peters Township which is in Washington County.’ Except that I would add South Fayette. I would include Peters Township for several reasons: The Almanac (South Hills community news) includes Peters along with USC, Bethel Park, Mt. Lebanon and South Fayette. School district collaborations and friendly rivalries particularly with USC, Bethel Park and Mt. Lebanon. The internet said so (Wikipedia)! We are proud to a part of the South Hills and Washington County.” – Brian Schill, executive director, Peters Township Chamber of Commerce

“Using the 19 corridor for north-south, Mt. Lebanon to South Strabane. East-west probably Jefferson Hills to Cecil.” – Keith Skirpan, via Facebook

“Here at SHIM, we consider the South Hills less a specific geography and more a state of mind and heart. From Dormont to Bethel Park and Whitehall to Upper St. Clair – and everywhere in between – the South Hills is where neighbors help neighbors. As a proud part of this community for more than a half-century, we see the South Hills as the people who live and work here, committed to lifting each other up in times of need, celebrating each other in times of joy and making our neighborhoods better for all.” – James Guffey, executive director, South Hills Interfaith Movement

“Brentwood, Baldwin, Bethel Park, Mt. Lebanon, Upper St. Clair, South Park, Pleasant Hills, Castle Shannon. Could consider part of West Mifflin and part of Scott Township – my two cents.” – Russ Spicuzza via Facebook

Editorial Director of Niche Publications

Katie Green came to Observer Publishing Company in 2012 as the editor of The Almanac. In 2016, she was promoted to editorial director of niche publications, overseeing all of the O-R's glossy magazines, special sections and event publications.

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