“Oh, what a cute little birdhouse!” is what Debby Krebs, family and consumer sciences and preschool teacher, thought when she first came upon a Little Free Library while driving to her parents’ house. It wasn’t until later when looking more closely that she realized it was full of books, and so her research on the Little Free Library began. She reached out to Amy D’Amico and the Canon-McMillan Horizon Foundation, a 501©(3) that directly benefits the students of the Canon-McMillan School District, with a letter asking for a grant to get a Little Free Library started at Canon-Mac. Some experts from her message below explain how the district could benefit from a Little Free Library:

“As a teacher of both high school students and preschool children, I believe strongly in the importance of exposing young children to all types of written texts at a young age to instill a lifelong love of reading. I believe that the children in my program, who are all future Canon-McMillan students, would benefit from having the opportunity to choose new stories to read with their families. The excitement of a new book will help encourage families to read more every day and prepare their children for learning to read our elementary schools.

The Little Free Library would also be available to high school students and staff members. Teachers who are also parents of young children could stop by and borrow or lend books. High school students could add novels of non-fiction texts at their level to the library as well. It would be exciting to see ‘The Giving Tree,’ ‘Jane Eyre,’ ‘The Very Hungry Caterpillar’ and ‘The Hobbit’ living together in our own little library.”

Her petition then went on to describe what would be needed, which would be a prebuilt library, the posts and the registration at the organization’s website, littlefreelibary.com. Krebs hopes that it will run on a “take a book – leave a book” policy. Staff members, students and members of the community can take a book for a day, a week, or a month and replace it with something else or return it back to the library. As the “steward” of this project, Krebs will monitor the library, and if a book has been there for months, she plans to take it out and donate it and replace it with something else.

As a maintenance-free addition, the Little Free Library should last for many years to come. Krebs hopes that maybe in the future, a reading bench could be installed next to the library to encourage families to sit and read with their children while they wait for preschool to start.

Canon-McMillan School District is always welcoming new and unique ideas and Ken Crowley, Canon-McMillan Principal thanks Krebs and the Horizon Foundation.

“Canon-McMillan High School would like to thank Mrs. Krebs for promoting literacy for all ages throughout the Canon-McMillan School District community. We welcome and encourage, not only students, but all community members to take advantage of this tremendous resource. We also would like to thank the Horizon Foundation for their support of this wonderful endeavor.”

There are already tons of books available, so make sure you stop by the Little Free Library outside of door number thirteen at the Canon-McMillan High School to check it out.

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