With profound economic uncertainty lingering at home and the clouds of fascism building abroad, Americans were in desperate need of an escape in the 1930s.

So they flooded into movie houses on a daily basis and listened to the radios that offered programs as varied as “Guiding Light,” “Lone Ranger,” “Charlie Chan” and “Father Knows Best.”

A note on comments

Our current commenting system, The World Table, is shutting down effective July 31. Ahead of then, we'll be transitioning to a new commenting system that will only require your subscriber credentials to log in. We'll be testing and deploying this new system in the coming days. Please email webmaster@observer-reporter.com or call 724-222-2200 ext. 2421 with any questions or concerns. Thanks for reading and commenting!

Staff Writer

Brad Hundt came to the Observer-Reporter in 1998 after stints at newspapers in Georgia and Michigan. He serves as editorial page editor, and has covered the arts and entertainment and worked as a municipal beat reporter.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article. See official rules here.

Thank you for reading!

Please purchase a subscription to continue reading. If you have a subscription, please Log In.