Bruce Kauffmann

The D-Day invasion, which occurred 75 years ago this week (June 6) in 1944, would never have happened without U.S. involvement. Likewise, it never would have happened had Britain not successfully repelled an invasion by Nazi Germany, thereby remaining the only free European nation in which A…

Bruce Kauffmann

The New York Times is rightly regarded as a newspaper with a liberal political bias, which is just fine provided it restricts that liberal bias to its editorial pages (the same applies to newspapers with conservative political biases). Today, however, at least in the view of this writer, the…

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Bruce Kauffmann

Under the direction of France’s most famous ruler, Napoleon Bonaparte, the Napoleonic Code – the Code Napoléon – took force this week (March 21) in 1804. Napoleon’s goal was to reform the archaic and hopelessly confusing French legal system, first by doing away with the thousands of feudal l…

Bruce Kauffmann

This week (Feb. 7) in 1946, Arthur Terminiello, a Catholic priest from Chicago, gave an inflammatory speech to the Christian Veterans of America, condemning communism and making racially charged statements. His speech delighted the 800 Christians in attendance, but enraged the nearly 1,600 o…

Bruce Kauffmann

Michael Sylvester Gardenzio Stallone was born in 1946, in the aptly named “Hell’s Kitchen” section of New York City, where as a teenager he was in constant trouble, having been kicked out of several schools. But he managed to graduate from high school in Philadelphia and attended the Univers…

Bruce Kauffmann

You can count on one hand the people who have won two Nobel Prizes. You can count with one finger the women who have done it. Her name is Marie “Madame” Curie, and she was awarded her second Nobel Prize this week (Dec. 31) in 1911 for her work in the field of radioactivity. Madame Curie is r…

Bruce Kauffmann

Throughout history there are many examples of women being unfairly treated by both law and custom, including (sometime) this week in 1847, when George Wray, an English commoner, sold his wife in a public auction to the highest bidder, William Harwood, for a shilling. Actually, Harwood was th…

Bruce Kauffmann

This week (August 28) in 1968, Professor Paul Ehrlich, a biologist teaching at Stanford University, published a best-selling book titled “The Population Bomb,” whose opening sentence was, “The battle to feed all of humanity is over. In the 1970s hundreds of millions of people will starve to …

Bruce Kauffmann

The columnist George F. Will once wrote, “We honor Jefferson, but we live in Hamilton’s country.” By that he meant the America we live in today is a country of commerce, industry, finance and manufacturing, just as Hamilton envisioned it. It is not, as Jefferson envisioned it, an agricultura…

Bruce Kauffmann

Article II of the Constitution, ratified this week (June 21) in 1788, details the powers of the executive branch of the government, and among the more controversial of those powers is the chief executive’s – the president’s – “Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offenses Against the Uni…

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