e-Edition and digital subscribers

We have corrected our login issues. Your username and password have not changed. Close any open windows. If you continue to experience difficulties, please contact 724-222-2200 ex. 2421 or webmaster@observer-reporter.com. Please include your account number or the phone number attached to your subscription so we can locate your digital account. Thank you!
Bruce Kauffmann

Prior to Nazi Germany’s invasion of Poland in September of 1939 there had been a series of “concentration camps” for the Jews that were located in Germany proper, but these “concentration camps” were mostly labor camps in which some Jews were killed, but most died because they were horribly …

Bruce Kauffmann

Tinian Island is located just 1,500 miles from mainland Japan, which, during World War II, made it an ideal launching pad for American B-29 Superfortress bombers against Japan. Therefore, after American forces captured Tinian in August of 1944, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers turned an isla…

Bruce Kauffmann

The Constitution clearly states that ex post facto (“after the fact”) laws are forbidden. An ex post facto law is one that goes into effect retroactively to a crime – that is, it makes an action illegal, and therefore criminal, even though the action took place before the law went into effect.

Latest News

Bruce Kauffmann

The D-Day invasion, which occurred 75 years ago this week (June 6) in 1944, would never have happened without U.S. involvement. Likewise, it never would have happened had Britain not successfully repelled an invasion by Nazi Germany, thereby remaining the only free European nation in which A…

Bruce Kauffmann

The New York Times is rightly regarded as a newspaper with a liberal political bias, which is just fine provided it restricts that liberal bias to its editorial pages (the same applies to newspapers with conservative political biases). Today, however, at least in the view of this writer, the…

Bruce Kauffmann

Under the direction of France’s most famous ruler, Napoleon Bonaparte, the Napoleonic Code – the Code Napoléon – took force this week (March 21) in 1804. Napoleon’s goal was to reform the archaic and hopelessly confusing French legal system, first by doing away with the thousands of feudal l…

Bruce Kauffmann

This week (Feb. 7) in 1946, Arthur Terminiello, a Catholic priest from Chicago, gave an inflammatory speech to the Christian Veterans of America, condemning communism and making racially charged statements. His speech delighted the 800 Christians in attendance, but enraged the nearly 1,600 o…

Bruce Kauffmann

Michael Sylvester Gardenzio Stallone was born in 1946, in the aptly named “Hell’s Kitchen” section of New York City, where as a teenager he was in constant trouble, having been kicked out of several schools. But he managed to graduate from high school in Philadelphia and attended the Univers…

Bruce Kauffmann

You can count on one hand the people who have won two Nobel Prizes. You can count with one finger the women who have done it. Her name is Marie “Madame” Curie, and she was awarded her second Nobel Prize this week (Dec. 31) in 1911 for her work in the field of radioactivity. Madame Curie is r…

Bruce Kauffmann

Throughout history there are many examples of women being unfairly treated by both law and custom, including (sometime) this week in 1847, when George Wray, an English commoner, sold his wife in a public auction to the highest bidder, William Harwood, for a shilling. Actually, Harwood was th…

Bruce Kauffmann

This week (August 28) in 1968, Professor Paul Ehrlich, a biologist teaching at Stanford University, published a best-selling book titled “The Population Bomb,” whose opening sentence was, “The battle to feed all of humanity is over. In the 1970s hundreds of millions of people will starve to …

Bruce Kauffmann

The columnist George F. Will once wrote, “We honor Jefferson, but we live in Hamilton’s country.” By that he meant the America we live in today is a country of commerce, industry, finance and manufacturing, just as Hamilton envisioned it. It is not, as Jefferson envisioned it, an agricultura…

Bruce Kauffmann

Article II of the Constitution, ratified this week (June 21) in 1788, details the powers of the executive branch of the government, and among the more controversial of those powers is the chief executive’s – the president’s – “Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offenses Against the Uni…

Reader Poll

Latest e-Edition

Upcoming Events