Stanford-Meyer-Lawsuit Soccer

Ray Chavez – member, Bay Area News Group

FILE – Stanford goalkeeper Katie Meyer (19) acknowledges the crowd after the team’s 4-1 win over UCLA in a semifinal of the NCAA Division I women’s soccer tournament in San Jose, Calif., on Dec. 6, 2019. Meyer’s parents have filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Stanford, saying the 21-year-old goalie was distressed over facing discipline over an incident from August 2021. Meyer took her own life in late February. The civil lawsuit was filed Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2022, in Santa Clara County Superior Court.

Katie Meyer’s parents have filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Stanford, saying the 21-year-old soccer goalie was distressed about facing discipline over an incident from August 2021.

Meyer took her own life in late February. The civil lawsuit was filed Wednesday in Santa Clara County Superior Court. USA Today obtained the lawsuit.

The lawsuit says Meyer spilled coffee on a Stanford football player who allegedly had sexually assaulted a soccer teammate. It also said that Meyer received a formal written notice on the evening of Feb. 28 – the same night she died – that charged her with a “Violation of the Fundamental Standard.”

The violation put her diploma on hold a few months before she was supposed to graduate, USA Today reported.

Her parents argue in the lawsuit that the notice came “after-hours” while Meyer was “alone in her room without any support or resources.” The lawsuit says that Meyer responded to the email “expressing how ‘shocked and distraught’ she was over being charged and threatened with removal from the university” and received a follow-up email that scheduled a meeting three days later.

Her parents said in the lawsuit that Meyer had “an acute stress reaction that impulsively led her” to take her life. The lawsuit also says that Meyer had told Stanford employees in November 2021 that she had “been scared for months that my clumsiness will ruin my chances of leaving Stanford on a good note.”

Stanford’s assistant vice president of external communications, Dee Mostofi, told USA Today on Wednesday that the school “strongly disagreed” with the lawsuit’s claim that Stanford was responsible in Meyer’s death and hadn’t seen the complaint.

Meyer was a part of the 2019 national champion women’s soccer team. She stopped two penalty shots in Stanford’s 5-4 shootout victory over North Carolina after a scoreless draw.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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